Pocky (Brown Sugar Candy)

Recipes for Shitty Cooks Like Me

pockyThis is not the chocolate dipped cracker sticks you buy at Uwajimaya. It is caramelized brown sugar chunks that my mom always called “pocky”.

Ingredients:
– brown sugar
– baking soda

Set up:
1. Melted brown sugar can ruin pots if you’re not careful, so right after you make this, soak your pot in water overnight so that the sugar stuck to it can dissolve off.

Instructions:
1. Put a pot on the stove and set the heat to medium. You don’t want it too hot, or you might burn the sugar instead of melting it.
2. Pour some brown sugar into the pot. The amount depends on how much you want to make, but I usually make about a cup at a time.
3. Stir the sugar as it melts, making sure it doesn’t stick and burn at the bottom of the pot.
4. Once it’s completely melted, add…

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Chewits: Xtreme sour apple

The Jellied Belly

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So, at a loss to find a sweet that was even remotely unusual in Tesco, I decided to settle for these sour Chewits. Perhaps a silly choice as I hate Fruit-Tella and usually most kinds of Chewits. However, on the other hand I love sour sweets, so I wanted to give them a shot.

First off, the packet is a bit more sexed-up than the usual Chewits affair. It’s black and green and a bit more Godzilla-y, I imagine to let the buyer know that they’re not the usual business.

There are 5 big sweets in the pack, so a bit less than the usual Chewits but they’re a lot bigger so it might well be a similar weight. I could check, but I can’t be bothered.

The sweets, as you can see, are a pretty lurid green (standard). They’re really quite hard, so I went for biting each in…

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Got the munchies for Munchies

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We at Candy Crash Test definitely have the munchies for the Munchies. Introduced by a British firm Mackintosh in the 1950’s, then was taken over by Nestle in 1988. Munchies are individual milk chocolate-coated sweets with a caramel and biscuit centre. There is a different variety of these which are plain chocolate and a mint filling, they used to be called Mintola, however the name changed to Mint Munchies then again to After Eight Bitesize. Continue reading

DEO disgusting neutralising body odour candy

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The future is Nuticosmetics,”

Nutricosmetics are nutritional supplements that have the ability to support the function and the structure of the skin. In Europe there is currently only one product, this product is the DEO perfume candy. DEO perfume candy was first introduced. DEO sells across Europe and in the United States and China…it is also now available in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

DEO uses ISOMALT, a sugar replacer derived from sugar beet to give a sweet taste without sugar. This also gives DEO a low calorie, low GI alternative. Geraniol is the ingredient that changes this sweet into a health and beauty product. Geraniol, an acrylic monoterpene-alcohol found in rose, lavender and vanilla, offers both anti-oxidant and fragrance properties. The fragrance property works in the same manner as Garlic in that the fragrance is transmitted through the pores of the skin when a person sweats, the difference with Geranoil is that the fragrance that is emitted is a wonderful rose smell.

There are 3mg of Geraniol in one DEO candy (each candy is 3.7g) with only 3.6mg required for a 65 kg female to enjoy the rose fragrance coming through the pores of the skin for 6 hours. It is known that high consumption of ISOMALT can cause a laxative effect, but with only 1 to 2 sweets required for 6 hours fragrance this is not a problem with the DEO Perfume Candy,” (http://www.perfumecandyuk.com/Perfumecandyuk/index.php/about-perfume-candy) Continue reading

Candy Corn…with flavour?

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Halloween has been and gone… many treats were eaten and many new candies came out in celebration.
Originally know as Opal Fruits, Starburst are unexplainably juicy fruit flavoured taffy like cuboid shaped candies. Packed with fruit juice to keep the mouth watering for more. Introduced by Mars in 1959, the name was picked by Peter Pfeffer in a competition that won him £5. Continue reading