Salted Licorice, Norway

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Salted licorice

When I went to Norway, I knew that a local treat is salted licorice, so I picked up a few cute packs.

Confession time: I brought these cute treats home to New York, but I never tasted the licorice.

Why, you might ask? Firstly, I forgot about them in the cupboard. But more importantly, I don’t like licorice. Strangely, I do enjoy licorice tea, but I strongly dislike the tea, and I even have an aversion to fennel, which has a licorice-like flavor.

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When I Googled “salted licorice Norway,” I found a Serious Eats article that proves that I was probably right that I would have hated the product; here’s an excerpt:

Faced with nearly 30 kinds of candies that are popular in Norway, I reverted to my excited five-year-old self after a prolific night of trick-or-treating.

Until I ate the salty licorice**.

** Unfortunately, salty licorice gets the shaft…

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Zag… What?

zagnut
As I have never heard of this candy bar before, I wondered what it could possibly be?
Zagnut is a candy bar produced and sold in the USA. Now manufactured under the Hershey’s brand umbrella. It consists of crunchy peanut butter and toasted coconut.

Zagnut has had a surge in popularity within the US military. The reason being, the bar doesn’t contain chocolate (unlike so many other candy bars) so it doesn’t melt whilst in hot countries like Iraq or Afghanistan. Candy stores sell them unevenly around the states as Zagnut has such a niche market.

The name hasn’t been fully explained, however it suggests that the “Nut” part, hints to the bars’ ingredients (which is understandable) and the “zag” part, which is slang for the type of candy bar that was out in the 1930s at the time this was produced.
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